Why Good People Do Bad Things in a Crisis

Why Good People Do Bad Things in a Crisis

Did You Know

During an organisational crisis, your "ethical switch" can get temporarily and unconsciously turned off, making you vulnerable to (very) bad decision-making. This phenomenon, called ethical blindness, is a temporary, involuntary and unconscious state that is so potent that people who experience it (and make poor decisions) are often shocked and surprised by their own behaviour afterwards. Could this help explain why we see good leaders and employees doing uncharacteristically bad things in a crisis? Here's an overview of the issue and some practical solutions for crisis managers. 

A Hot-Cold Combo Approach to Crisis Management

A Hot-Cold Combo Approach to Crisis Management

In 2010, Bruce Schneier gave a great Ted Talk called The Security Mirage and said “..security is two different things: it's a feeling, and it's a reality. And they're different. You could feel secure even if you're not. And you can be secure even if you don't feel it. Really, we have two separate concepts mapped onto the same word". Replace the word “security” with “crisis” and it fits just as perfectly.  In practice, corporate crisis management teams are usually (much) stronger at dealing with one or the other: realities or feelings.